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  1. #1
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    Clearing up Cannonsville

    I just read an article today in the newspaper about efforts to reduce the amounts of phosphorus and other fertilizer residues, entering Cannonsville reservoir. Aside from all the politics, can anyone venture a guess as to how that might impact the ecosystem as it relates to fish in the reservoir(or below it)? I remember reading in "The Neversink" (I believe that was the title of the book) a quote that indicated that organic wastes in a river were a boon for invertebrate life. I believe it actually was in regards to some town along the Beaverkill discharging waste into the river sometime in the past. ANYWAY, what might the impact be, due to reduced "fuel" for the ecosystem, in Cannonsville? I'm sure though, that it might clear up some of the algae in the river up in Deposit...

    John


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    Well, for the 20 or so of you that cared enough to even read this thread, , I'll post the article in the hopes that IT might provide some substance for discussion.

    Aside from the original question of mine, let me throw this thought out there to stir the pot, The hope of NYC's is to cut down on the phosphorus in the reservoir. This will lead to less algae growth. That will lead to better tasting water. That might spell disaster to the West Branch AND the mainstem (if NYC decides that Cannonsville water is JUST as tasty as water from the other reservoirs). Cannonsville (WB)water might not be the default water of choice to prop up Montague... just a thought...

    John

    The link (and then the article):

    http://www.thedailystar.com/news/sto.../16/brite.html
    Grants may boost Delaware’s economy

    By Jack Mazurak
    Staff Writer
    A round of federal grants announced last week aimed at improving reservoir water quality could help Delaware County’s economy in the future, a county official said.The grants coming directly to the county total more than $360,000, while hundreds of thousands more will be spent on outside research that could
    improve area reservoirs.

    Dean Frazier, commissioner of the county Department of Watershed Affairs, said Sunday the grants will
    pay for continued work on phosphorus reduction and storm water runoff management. By funding existingprograms, wastewater treatment plants in the county are allowed to expand. And offeringwastewater-treatment capacity, he said, is key to attracting new industry and encouraging area businesses to expand.Nearly $307,000 will be allocated into programs to reduce phosphorus runoff.

    Frazier said the main concern is the Cannonsville Reservoir, where phosphorus levels continue to cause algae blooms. Algae creates a bad taste, discoloration and a strong odor.He said about $200,000 will be spent on reducing phosphorus levels that build up in farm soil. Purchased feed and fertilizers bring in
    phosphorus — a chemical that eventually runs off in rain and spring thaws."They’re looking at trying to reduce the amounts that run off by more efficient use of phosphorus on the farms," he said.

    Another $55,000 will funnel into the Delaware County Planning Department to study storm-water runoff in Walton and other municipalities in the Cannonsville Reservoir basin.Using the Global Positioning and Geographic Information systems — GPS and GIS —workers will be able to track runoff, Frazier said. "The storm water infrastructure work will help communities to choose where to do storm-water management projects," he said.

    Announcing the grants Wednesday, Gov. George Pataki said New York’s reservoirs constitute one of the largest unfiltered surface drinking water systems in the world and support more than 9 million people."These projects will build on our ongoing watershed protection efforts that are helping to improve
    water quality while enhancing and preserving the economy and rural character of local communities," Pataki said.

    The grants will also pay for continued monitoring of phosphorus levels in ground water and on lowland farms in the Cannonsville basin. Frazier said he and the Watershed Affairs staff applied for the grants in September to continue projects already in the works."It’s not like this is a new. We’ve been fortunate to
    receive more than $1 million so far," he said.

    In 2000, the county got a $445,000 grant to reduce phosphorus in the Cannonsville Reservoir basin. Another $500,000 went to study runoff containing phosphorous from farms.And those grants have been paying off. By August, 2002, because of falling phosphorus levels, the New York City Department of Environmental Protection lifted a ban on wastewater treatment plant expansions. Frazier said that capacity translates into space for economic growth.

    "The (phosphorus) levels have been going down, according to the city’s monitorings," Frazier said. “What we don’t want to do is go back under those restrictions," he said. "If you can keep one layer of phosphorus regulations from being part of the problem, then that’s a good thing."


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    Hi Future,

    Properly managed this can be a good thing.

    If NYC can use West Branch water or East Branch water equally, then the Cannonsville will not be drained to 3%. Water will be released from Pepacton.

    NYC still will need the same amount of water and the Montague target will aslo need the same amount. What would be great is that when a 800+ cfs release is required, we may be able to get more on the East Branch too.

    The problem here lies in that Cannonsville will still fill more quickly and is likey to be drained anyway.

    Negotiations are way too complex to even think about right now.

    Good stuff!! Keep it coming!!!

    jim


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