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    Catskills - 10.8.06

    Fished the Beaverkill and East Branch on Sunday, and it was a beautiful day for it. Got to the Beaverkill at around 10am. Fish were rising VERY sporadically and theartoflee landed the only fish of the day early on. I had one fish come up for a floating caddis emerger but missed the hookset. There were some bugs in the air, namely big tan caddis, BWO's, midges, and sulphurs(pic below) which I noticed hatching in more abundance in the slow water near the banks as we were leaving.

    We left there around 1pm to check out the West Branch which ended up being very muddy, so we decided to fish the East Branch after lunch.

    Again, fish were rising very sporadically on the East Branch with caddis, small and larger olives(pic below), and black flying ants on the water in good abundance.

    While reviewing the pictures on my computer, I noticed that in one of them I happened to catch a fish rising directly in front of theartoflee. It made for a nice shot I think.






    "Three-fourths of the Earth's surface is water, and one-fourth is land. It is quite clear that the good Lord intended us to spend triple the amount of time fishing as taking care of the lawn." Chuck Clark

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    Re: Catskills - 10.8.06

    Definetely looks like a summer sulphur (steno) but I dont see the pics of the BWO.

    --FT
    Nothing grows faster than a fish between the time the fish takes your fly...and the time he gets away.

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    Re: Catskills - 10.8.06

    Quote Originally Posted by Fly Tier View Post
    Definetely looks like a summer sulphur (steno) but I dont see the pics of the BWO.
    I thought the second pic was an olive?? It was a lot smaller than the bug in the top pic and had a greenish body with dun colored wings. Is one a female sulphur and the other a male?

    "Three-fourths of the Earth's surface is water, and one-fourth is land. It is quite clear that the good Lord intended us to spend triple the amount of time fishing as taking care of the lawn." Chuck Clark

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    Re: Catskills - 10.8.06

    Can someone with a better knowledge of mayflies than me identify the bug in the second pic? I was sure it was an olive.

    "Three-fourths of the Earth's surface is water, and one-fourth is land. It is quite clear that the good Lord intended us to spend triple the amount of time fishing as taking care of the lawn." Chuck Clark

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    Re: Catskills - 10.8.06

    steve, I am certainly no bug expert. It appeared to me that both photos are the same insect. The first tip off to me was the mottled wings. Thats also what threw me off when you said Sulphur. The typical sulphur that most see during the busy season is the invaria (larger, more orangy in body color and the Dorethea, smaller, more prolific on the west branch and a much more yellow to pale yellow. Solid wings, not mottled.

    The BWO also has more of a solid wing and, i may be wrong but i think most of the BWO species you will see this time of year are much much smaller than that bug. on the 20's. And, I am not aware of a bwo with a mottled wing.

    I suspect from just a glance, both are steno's (summer sulphur)

    --FT
    Nothing grows faster than a fish between the time the fish takes your fly...and the time he gets away.

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    Re: Catskills - 10.8.06

    It looks like a an olive that they used to call a hebes.On the water it looks like a sulpher. You can match it with a pale or dull sulpher imitation. It is a late season fly. Size 18.


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    Re: Catskills - 10.8.06

    Quote Originally Posted by EB WADER View Post
    It looks like a an olive that they used to call a hebes.On the water it looks like a sulpher. You can match it with a pale or dull sulpher imitation. It is a late season fly. Size 18.
    Thanks EB

    The picture makes the body look lighter than it actually was, I should've clarified that. It was more of a green body as opposed to the yellow of the sulphur.

    You're pretty much right with the size too. The sulphur was larger, maybe 14.

    "Three-fourths of the Earth's surface is water, and one-fourth is land. It is quite clear that the good Lord intended us to spend triple the amount of time fishing as taking care of the lawn." Chuck Clark

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    Re: Catskills - 10.8.06

    Hi,

    If you want to identify bugs from pictures, a side view really helps.

    Cauccis/Nastasis Instant Mayfly Guide can help with the shape of the hind wings.

    Number of tails and hind wings are the key to figuring out most bugs. heptagenia hebe and Stenocron heterotarale both have two tails.

    The season is right for both bugs.

    The sulphur is a Stencron heterotarsale

    The olive I also believe to be the hebe.

    The sulphur has dark marks on the legs and the hebe does not.

    They are both probably females based on the eyes and the length of the front legs. Males have big or double eyes to find females in the mating swarm and long front legs to grab them!!!!

    I am not sure if current names are different.

    I am a bit rusty on my bugs, so do not bet much money on my guess!!

    The heterotarsale is my favorite bug. They hatch in sparse numbers for a long time and a #14 cdc emerger or cdc dun will catch fish most of the time, even if the bug is not emerging. The females have orange eggs in a yellow body makes them reddish orange color. Very pretty. I use it as one of my go to patterns all summer long.

    Wow, it is nice to talk about bugs and fishing for a change!!!!

    Jim


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