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Thread: New Rod &Reel?

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    New Rod &Reel?

    Im looking to spend no more than $300 for the rod and reel. What do you guys think would be some good choices? I have a 6 and a 7 wt from LLbean, the quest models, aint bad for the price i suppose. Well at least ive caught plenty of fish on both of them. Im not sure if I want a 5 wt or maybe a 4wt. I want something for all around trout fishing including some small wild streams. I did just fine last year on NJ streams with the 6 wt. Both the rods I have now are 9 ft. I took both of them out to Wisconsin and fished the West Fork of the Kickapoo river and caught some wild rainbows but the 9ft 6 wt rod was way too big for this stream. Maybe a shorter 5wt would be good? Thanks in advance for any help.


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    7' - 7.5' Four Weight Rod with Medium action.

    Walt

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    Rods 'n Reels

    Rods - Check out Temple Fork Outfitters, or Redington for inexpensive rods.
    I have cast some of them and they're super. IF I had to do it over again,
    I would take a better look at them - especially for $200 or less ( why spend mid-500 for an XP or SLT? yeah, they are better BUT NOT THAT MUCH BETTER ). Perhaps check out St. Croix, some of the new Sage rods lineup, Scott, and G.Loomis. Orvis also makes a less expensive lineup. At $300, I really liked the Winston IBIS ( if you like fast rods ).

    Reels - I DO like my Orvis Battenkill 3-4 ( disc ) - especially for $100 bucks, I also have an Orvis Rocky Mountain Large Arbor that I think is especially good for under 100 bucks - it is also a disc drag model ( looks good on a green or black rod, too. ) but you can go cheaper. I read some good reviews on Redington and Loomis reels and as I remember, they are NOT expensive. On smaller streams, you probably dont need a "whale-stopper". Also, you may want to check out the new Ross FlyWater, or Galvan Rush reel.

    The_Sib

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    I think you hit it right on when you said you're thinking of a "shorter" 5 wt rod.
    I recently bought a Loomis GL3 8.5' 5wt to compliment my 9' 5wt Scott Eclipse. The shorter rod is a perfect addition. My Scott leans toward a 6wt.. absolutely love it for big rivers & big trout. The 8.5' GL3 handles smaller streams, medium rivers, and big trout!
    This GL3 leans a little toward a 4 wt... a little less butt diameter compared with the 9' version. So, no matter which brand, if you want some versatilty consider an 8.5' 5wt.


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    I have a 5wt 8' Diamondback rod that is very nice - light in the hand and a smooth action. Just bought a STH pop reel to match, and for 60 bucks it is pretty nice. However, for dry flies on the smaller streams of NJ a 7.5' 4 wt is nice (don't think those 2wt or 3 wts are versatile enough, although some folks love them).

    Finally, the Jordan Ross rods are an affordable alternative to Temple Fork etc that are made in the USA (most of the other affordable rods are made in Korea or China - Ross keeps people in depressed Utica NY working). Shannon's in Califon is a Jordan Ross dealer.


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    what's with the reel?

    I too am in the market for a rod and reel. I used to fish back in the late '80s when I lived near Hartford, but stored away my gear when I moved down south. I moved back to Jersey 3 yrs ago and decided to renew my interest in fly fishing. I took my old rod and reel down to the local fly shop and asked them to hook me up with a new line. Which they did AFTER they got up from the floor in laughter looking at my ancient sticks. What was the term they used? Banana rod? Anyway I thought I would see if my old gear would work well enough for me to figure out if I would still be interested enough before I invested in new stuff. So I have been doing some research on rods but can't figure out why a reel would be north of $100. I was taught that a reel is just a place to hold your line and doesn't do a whole lot for you. So what is the deal here? Do I really need a new reel?


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    I agree. Reels need close tolerances so the line or leader doesn't get caught and an OK drag. I never require the drag to pull in a trout. Click reels are OK and then I use a palming reel when needed. The old "drag that can stop a truck" seems to be overkill when I am usually fishing a 5X or 6X tippet - normally my drag is set at damn near the lightest setting. Saltwater or salmon/steelhead fishing is different(saltwater needs corrosion resistance too!), but even large trout don't require much of a drag. Smoothness, close tolerances, and light weight are key for me and that can be found in less expensive reels. Never feel I lost a fish due to the reel - boneheaded moves are another matter.


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    Quote Originally Posted by wineaddict
    have been doing some research on rods but can't figure out why a reel would be north of $100. I was taught that a reel is just a place to hold your line and doesn't do a whole lot for you. So what is the deal here? Do I really need a new reel?
    Don't you want to be stylin on the river? Doesn't it excite you to know that others may be admiring your reel? I get pulled over all the time by people inquiring about my reel. It shocks me that people would be so interested in it. It's a Sage, circa 2002, antique by today's standards.

    Anyhow, the reason you pay so much for a reel is for R&D, production, and advertising. When you purchase a reel, you should buy from a reputable company. That doesn't mean you have to get a Hardy or an Orvis or an Abel or a Lamson... Just buy something that's light and has a good drag and make sure you do your own research on the reel. You want to make sure other people haven't had any trouble with the functionality, but most importantly, make sure you ask those people, "How many guys stop you on or around a river to admire your reel?". If the answer is ZERO, run far away.

    Good luck

    Pictures taken before/after/during fly fishing:
    http://dcabarle.smugmug.com/Sports/F...79119552_XXeHe

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    and here I thought it was the hat that was the stream stopper!


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    Adding to what JeffK said regarding JP Ross Flyrods (www.jprossflyrods.com) these rods are top notch quality for the money. I live an hour from his shop (Rising Trout Outfitter) and a couple weeks ago I stopped by and casted a 43T & K357 for an hour.. back and forth. I'm eventually going to get one.. cant make up my mind which. I don't know how long he'll be able to hold his prices. I think his rods are going to become very well known, and I have a feeling what we are witnessing here in Utica, NY is something special.


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    Some of the low end fly equipment from the 50s & early 60s may have been the main reason that spin fishing was so popular back then, but you'd have to look pretty hard to find something from the 80s that I wouldn't use.

    Perhaps the "laughter" was simply an attempt to make you spend some more $$$.

    Obviously, unless it's damaged or worn out, it should work just as well as it did before.


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    I remember the 60's equipment without much fondness - too soft Shakespeare Wonderods, mediocre lines, crappy hackles and so-so floatants made dry fly fishing a chore. First decent rod I had was in 1969 when I made an 8' 5wt Fenwick fiberglass rod from a blank (too expensive to buy new!). Have used cheap and expensive graphite rods, and while some seem sweeter than others (a real personal taste issue), all have been OK. Also, some hardware is better than others, but all guides seem to wear well these days and all reel seats seem to hold the reel - so the basic functionality is there. In fact, since I generally like a medium action rod some of those super expensive rockets seem a touch harsh to me. On the other hand, those beginner rods always advertise forgiving action, easy on tippets, easy to learn feel of rod - things I still want and some of my favorite rods are the cheap ones. I rarely cast far to catch fish and don't need a distance caster. I would say any old graphite rod in good shape would be OK and that goes for the "brown" fiberglass rods like the Fenwicks, Berkelys, and Scientific Anglers. Only get a better rod when you feel something is missing in doing the fishing you prefer - maybe a lighter rod for subtle dry presentation, a longer rod for wet fly/czech nymphing, a heavier rod to pitch weighted buggers, a shorter rod for tiny, brush filled streams, etc. We all want something different and prefer to fish different waters, and most needs can be filled by either cheap or expensive outfits.

    However, don't cheap out on the line, leaders, or tippets - false economy will cost you plenty of fish here. You can catch fish with just a line, leader and fly (without the rod and reel); you will never catch fish with just a rod and a reel.


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