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    Dep increases releases at cannonsville reservoir to facilitate necessary repairs

    viewed this today on FUDR facebook page...
    i wonder how long they'll need to release???

    press release link here

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 15, 2015 CONTACT: deppressoffice@dep.nyc.gov, (718) 595-6600 No. XX DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMETAL PROTECTION INCREASES RELEASES AT CANNONSVILLE RESERVOIR TO FACILITATE NECESSARY REPAIRS
    The New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) today increased drinking water diversions and downstream releases from Cannonsville Reservoir to facilitate necessary repairs in response to an ongoing turbid discharge from a rock embankment below Cannonsville Dam. DEP, its regulators, and consulting experts do not believe the turbid flow represents any imminent threat to the safety of the dam. While repairs are made, DEP believes it is prudent to draw down the reservoir through increased releases out of an abundance of caution; reducing storage does not pose a risk to the city’s water supply. The turbid flow below the dam was discovered when workers were drilling borings in preparation for design and construction of the future hydroelectric facility to be built there. During the drilling, workers noticed a flow of turbid water coming from a rock embankment near the release chamber. They immediately contacted DEP engineers and ceased all work. A preliminary investigation indicated that the drilling released ground water under natural pressure several dozen feet below surface level, causing an upward flow of water and sediment that is reaching the West Branch Delaware River. Since then, DEP has met with its regulators, consulting engineers, and other experts to further investigate the condition, and to identify next steps for monitoring and repair. In addition to reducing storage at Cannonsville Reservoir, DEP is taking several steps to minimize any potential risks. These include 24-hour monitoring by employees at the site, regular analysis of dam-safety instrumentation, and testing of the turbid sediment to identify and understand its origin. DEP is also working with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation on the design and implementation of repairs to stop the flow of water and sediment below Cannonsville Dam. Federal, state, county and local officials – including officials from New Jersey and Pennsylvania – have been made aware of the condition at Cannonsville Dam. These officials will be updated as DEP continues to examine and address the flow condition. DEP also plans to host a series of public meetings to further inform downstream residents in the days and weeks ahead. Details on those meetings will follow soon. Placed into service in 1964, Cannonsville Reservoir was the last of New York City’s 19 reservoirs to be built. Water drawn from Cannonsville enters the West Delaware Tunnel and travels 44 miles to the upper end of Rondout Reservoir. From there, it is carried in the 85-milelong Delaware Aqueduct. Water is released from Cannonsville Reservoir under the terms of the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court Decree, and a flow program, known as the Flexible Flow Management Program, agreed upon by New York City and the states of Delaware, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. All other reservoirs in the city’s Delaware System will continue to meet their downstream release requirements under the Flexible Flow Management Program while the condition at Cannonsville is investigated and repaired. DEP manages New York City’s water supply, providing more than one billion gallons of high quality water each day to more than 9 million New Yorkers. This includes more than 70 upstate communities and institutions in Ulster, Orange, Putnam and Westchester counties who consume an average of 110 million total gallons of drinking water daily from New York City’s water supply system. This water comes from the Catskill, Delaware, and Croton watersheds that extend more than 125 miles from the City, and the system comprises 19 reservoirs, three controlled lakes, and numerous tunnels and aqueducts. DEP has nearly 6,000 employees, including almost 1,000 scientists, engineers, surveyors, watershed maintainers and other professionals in the upstate watershed. In addition to its $70 million payroll and $157 million in annual taxes paid in upstate counties, DEP has invested more than $1.7 billion in watershed protection programs—including partnership organizations such as the Catskill Watershed Corporation and the Watershed Agricultural Council—that support sustainable farming practices, environmentally sensitive economic development, and local economic opportunity. In addition, DEP has a robust capital program with nearly $14 billion in investments planned over the next 10 years that will create up to 3,000 construction-related jobs per year. For more information, visit nyc.gov/dep, like us on Facebook at facebook.com/nycwater, or follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/nycwater

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    Re: Dep increases releases at cannonsville reservoir to facilitate necessary repairs

    reducing storage does not pose a risk to the city’s water supply

    Can we use this quote in the future........and.....surf's up!


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    flyI4 is offline Fishizzle, I use worms but I'm looking to upgrade!
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    Re: Dep increases releases at cannonsville reservoir to facilitate necessary repairs

    I thought the same exact thing Tompg. There is plenty of water so no risk to draw it down a bit- unless its for the health of the river of course.


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    Re: Dep increases releases at cannonsville reservoir to facilitate necessary repairs

    Quote Originally Posted by chromefinder View Post
    reducing storage does not pose a risk to the city’s water supply
    Great minds think alike. That leaped out at me when I just read it. I hope angler and watershed groups ram that quote down the DRBC's and NY City's throats for years to come.

    A sinking fly is closer to Hell - ​Unknown

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    Re: Dep increases releases at cannonsville reservoir to facilitate necessary repairs

    Of course the pending damage to the ecosystem if it is a dam leak and difficult to repair could be a big problem. I haven't heard much yet but officials are concerned as the water is silting showing signs of erosion. Is the water coming from an aquifer or from the bottom of Cannonsville? I heard it's more than a trickle 127CFS. NYC is now desperately trying to drop the water in the reservoir via max releases to the river and into the drinking water system as a precaution (for repairs if required but no doubt if the dam is leaking less water in it is not a bad thing). I heard they are going to try and jam concrete into the the flow to see if they can stop it.

    They will continue to let water out of the dam until at least September 1. Depending upon rain, If 2000CFs are coming out of the dam per day, we would be down to roughly 50% to 60% full. If more is taken out, then less water in Cannonsville (not sure how much they can divert into the drinking water system). After Sept 1 who knows.

    The bottom line at the moment is that they don't really know much. Let's hope for the best.

    "That wasn't your fly... was it?

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    flyI4 is offline Fishizzle, I use worms but I'm looking to upgrade!
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    Re: Dep increases releases at cannonsville reservoir to facilitate necessary repairs

    I'll expect an abrupt change to 120 cfs in october overnight to keep tradition alive. This could get dicey long term drawing the res down to such low levels. U don't always get a big snow year like last to help you play catch up.


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    Re: Dep increases releases at cannonsville reservoir to facilitate necessary repairs

    Quote Originally Posted by NJFred View Post
    Is the water coming from an aquifer or from the bottom of Cannonsville? I heard it's more than a trickle 127CFS.
    they are basically the same thing at that point. water is driven around (below) the dam by the head pressure behind it. sounds like DEP potentially messed up by basically relieving some constraining pressures that could prove to be problematic if not effectively addressed in short order.

    super simplified illustration and discussion of implications:
    NPTEL Online IIT Guwahati


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    Re: Dep increases releases at cannonsville reservoir to facilitate necessary repairs

    Quote Originally Posted by eddavidson9 View Post
    they are basically the same thing at that point. water is driven around (below) the dam by the head pressure behind it. sounds like DEP potentially messed up by basically relieving some constraining pressures that could prove to be problematic if not effectively addressed in short order.

    super simplified illustration and discussion of implications:
    NPTEL Online IIT Guwahati
    I will say that I don't know exactly where they were drilling, and there are some (at least potentially) confined and semi-confined aquifers with (relatively) higher elevation recharge areas (ergo high potentiometric head) in the vicinity. they typically would not produce turbid flowing artesian conditions, but who knows.


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    Re: Dep increases releases at cannonsville reservoir to facilitate necessary repairs

    Quote Originally Posted by eddavidson9 View Post
    I will say that I don't know exactly where they were drilling, and there are some (at least potentially) confined and semi-confined aquifers with (relatively) higher elevation recharge areas (ergo high potentiometric head) in the vicinity. they typically would not produce turbid flowing artesian conditions, but who knows.
    Thanks... Sounds like you know something about dams.

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    Re: Dep increases releases at cannonsville reservoir to facilitate necessary repairs

    What I know for sure at this point is that the plan is to draw down the Reservoir to Zero. They are emptying the Cannonsville which should be done by mid to late September.

    This is not a rumor or some conspiracy theory BTW.


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    Re: Dep increases releases at cannonsville reservoir to facilitate necessary repairs

    Quote Originally Posted by JOE.T View Post
    What I know for sure at this point is that the plan is to draw down the Reservoir to Zero. They are emptying the Cannonsville which should be done by mid to late September.

    This is not a rumor or some conspiracy theory BTW.

    The plan is to see whether the turbidity is coming from the holes they drilled or somewhere inside the dam filing. They're pretty confident it's coming from the holes, in which case, they won't empty the reservoir, but they're continuing at maximum release just to be on the safe side in case it's the worst scenario. They'll know next week.

    Sounds to me like it's very unlikely that they'll empty the reservoir, and they're just being super-conservative. Hope I'm right about that.


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    Re: Dep increases releases at cannonsville reservoir to facilitate necessary repairs

    I am no Civil Engineer, but I when I red this excerpt from "Proceedings of the Michigan Engineering Society" published in 1885 page 41. It was alarming.



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    "Hatchery fish have the same colors, but they always seem muted like bad reproductions of great art." Bill Barich

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