Delaware River Club
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  1. #37
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    Re: Mr. Cahill and the Sulphurs

    We have to real on some luck with stuff crossing the boarder. I will hook you up with Stenacron ecology in a video My son and I did on a new species I am working with right now. Stenacron are very specific about where and how they live. Just copy and paste this youtube link to see it.

    I totally do not mind this is fun

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CbSm...&feature=share



  2. #38
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    Re: Mr. Cahill and the Sulphurs

    "I'm not out on the river to win." -Kieth Rutherford

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    Re: Mr. Cahill and the Sulphurs

    Thanks buddy


  4. #40
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    Re: Mr. Cahill and the Sulphurs

    Quote Originally Posted by Stenacron man View Post
    We have to real on some luck with stuff crossing the boarder. I will hook you up with Stenacron ecology in a video My son and I did on a new species I am working with right now. Stenacron are very specific about where and how they live. Just copy and paste this youtube link to see it.

    I totally do not mind this is fun

    [link]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CbSmSg6hQLg&feature=share[/link]

    Dude...I gotta say....great video, but I am going to call you a geek, in particular a bug geek......not an insult, a respectful poke.....
    Keep up the postings and here is one, an easy one, but I live in polluted New Jersey so, pretty cool....




    Funny, I took this picture in my kitchen....


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    "I'm not out on the river to win." -Kieth Rutherford

  5. #41
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    Re: Mr. Cahill and the Sulphurs



    I totally take as a complement. So I am like the only bug guy here on this site ???


    These guys are not really my knowledge strong point but I will go with
    (Siphlonurus quebecensis or S alternatus) the gray drakes and most likely
    S quebecensis




  6. #42
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    Re: Mr. Cahill and the Sulphurs

    Quote Originally Posted by Stenacron man View Post


    I totally take as a complement. So I am like the only bug guy here on this site ???


    These guys are not really my knowledge strong point but I will go with
    (Siphlonurus quebecensis or S alternatus) the gray drakes and most likely
    S quebecensis

    FF is one of our resident bug nerds, but I think you've found that out already..


  7. #43
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    Re: Mr. Cahill and the Sulphurs

    Quote Originally Posted by Future Fanatic View Post
    OH YEAH?!?

    What's THIS one...

    Attachment 11020
    This is an easy one: Ephemeroptera Galbinus oculus

    Pictures taken before/after/during fly fishing:
    http://dcabarle.smugmug.com/Sports/F...79119552_XXeHe

  8. #44
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    Re: Mr. Cahill and the Sulphurs

    Quote Originally Posted by Stenacron man View Post
    I love PA and would love to visit it again I lived near Lewisburg for years. I would love to take you up on that offer but I don't have a Canadian passport at this time. So if I cross the boarded I can't come back. The most important feature is like "YOU" said the eye spacing and that they are both spinners.

    So tell me why in the yellow carolina, the eyes are very wide spread, and the pudicum they are tight, but both are in the last 12 hours of their life span ????

    The eyes on the Carolina are spread wide apart due to inbreeding. That's what happens. There's a lot of that going on down there in the Carolina's. Look at this specimen:



    It's still a human but I think the type is still up in the air.

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    Pictures taken before/after/during fly fishing:
    http://dcabarle.smugmug.com/Sports/F...79119552_XXeHe

  9. #45
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    Re: Mr. Cahill and the Sulphurs

    Quote Originally Posted by Stenacron man View Post
    Dr Traver one of the leading authors of the biology of a mayfly 1935 does state tail size in her 1933 description on the female pudicum larva. No other descriptions state tail size for that species that I can find and currently have over 400 species manuals;

    pudicum for larva;

    Body size for female; 12-14 mm
    Tails for female larva; 18-20 mm

    Generally in most Heptageniidae the tails lengthen as they molt from subimago or dun, to the imago state being a spinner. Most have a average tail length between 22-24 mm for a male.

    I know from my own personally study of the vicarium complex that,
    (M vicarium), (M vicarium / rivulicolum), and (M vicarium / fuscum)

    and they all have tails that are 22 mm. In that study I reared 67 males and 173 females to the adult stage from larva for that complex. The female adults all had tails that were 20 mm on average. So because a "true vicarium" male has a body length of 16 mm and a tail length of 23 mm on average that makes the tails about 1 5/8 X the length of the body. From what I can find M pudicum male is 14 mm in body size with a likely tail length of 24 mm.

    So without going crazy with the math that would be just shy of 2 X the length of the body. Without measuring we all tend to over estimate the size of things whether its a bug or the lock-ness monster, its just part of being the species that we are. However I do agree that in the pudicum photo the tails look very long to long to be M vicarium.


    All I can say is this.

    I am currently writing a book on the genus Stenacron and have spent the last 3 years 12 -16 hrs a day, 7 days a week, with no days off studying this genus and for sure 1000% the other one is Stenacron Carolina!!! And the suspected pudicum is 100000000000% not a Stenacron. I have in the past 3 years looked at over 500+ Stenacron samples in all stages I know them like I know my family. Right now I have a fish tank running right beside me with about 70 Stenacron larva alive and looking at me while type right now. I have in solution well over 200 larva to dissect the winter. Trust me the dark one is not a Stenacron.




    Like I stated before with dissection this is all just speculation.







    I think you're wasting a lot of valuable quality time writing this book that probably won't get past the exit door in any book store brave enough to carry such a creature.

    The bug stuff in interesting for as long as it takes me to tie one on.

    Pictures taken before/after/during fly fishing:
    http://dcabarle.smugmug.com/Sports/F...79119552_XXeHe

  10. #46
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    Re: Mr. Cahill and the Sulphurs

    Quote Originally Posted by dcabarle View Post
    The bug stuff in interesting for as long as it takes me to tie one on.
    I believe if you "tie one on" before you start reading the bug stuff, it seems more interesting...

    John
    Some circumstantial evidence is very strong, as when you find a trout in the milk.--Henry David Thoreau

  11. #47
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    Re: Mr. Cahill and the Sulphurs

    Quote Originally Posted by Stenacron man View Post


    I totally take as a complement. So I am like the only bug guy here on this site ???


    These guys are not really my knowledge strong point but I will go with
    (Siphlonurus quebecensis or S alternatus) the gray drakes and most likely
    S quebecensis

    I thought it was a Quill Gordon(Epeorus pleuralis).....as I get them every year around the same time, from a small creek out my front door....this was a female, obviously, but I also get them males and their Frank Poncharello sunglasses give them away....

    "I'm not out on the river to win." -Kieth Rutherford

  12. #48
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    Re: Mr. Cahill and the Sulphurs

    Actually this book is the first of it kind. Yes it will have all the taxonomic information and biology reading. But, It will also have very simple sort descriptions for even a child to read using words like face and head. More important are the illustrations for everything, with red arrows pointing to everything important. The idea is the reading is optional. It will be so easy to use a 6 year old can look at the picture and then pick the one that matches it, and bang you just ID a bug. The idea is anybody who has and interest no matter your age or education, or level of interest can pick a winner. The entire book is mostly illustrations in color of every bug in the genus in all stages. Also this book does not state species rather it is on the different forms. By not stating species and directing the reader to where they will find the current species status, the book will never go out of date. Finding species from form is an inevitable course of events. Form or type of bug in the genus validates species status.

    As the readers interest and experience level goes up they can choose to start reading the more complex stuff. With all the crapping environmentally issues we face today!! tomorrow they will be worse. Trying to encourage our youth to have interest in insects is important. All insects are the keystone foundation of the entire animal kingdom. All insect are right in the middle of the food chain. But most importantly they eat and breakdown all micro organisms and turn them into proteins. Without them nothing would exist.

    Here is a real example and tell me if there is a difference between them. This is about comparing apples to apples, and not apples to oranges. I bet you can see the difference. Well guess what without them side by side some of the best in the world cant tell them apart. I have confused the two so many times. Now I know them like my own family.


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