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  1. #25
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    Andre,


    You may want to try archery fishing for carp. It's one of the only fish that the state of NJ will allow you to take with a bow and arrow. See it, shoot it, reel in. Sounds easy anyway.


  2. #26
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    Andre- I used to fish for Grass Carp on a pond in Princeton...actually got to be pretty good at it. On a good day I'd catch one or two...all 10+ lbs. Also snapped a Sage rod on one, but that's another story. Here are some key tips: You can only catch a carp when it's feeding. Either on the surface ('clooping' is the proper English term...they who invented Carp fishing), or on the bottom (tailing). If they're schooled up, and not moving, forget it. It's a total waste of time. I've had best luck early in the season, using dry flies. Early season (i.e. now through May), they're not too fussy. You want a big bushy dry fly that looks like a leaf (for grass carp, anyway). Sofa Pillow with a green body will do just fine. You'll need a LONG leader, 15' or more, if you can throw it. Carp are very line shy. Look for a solitary carp clooping - if you cast into a group, the problem is that you're bound to spook one, and the one will spook the rest. There's a lot of randomness to the pattern of a carp feeding on the surface...but find one that's feeding regularly, and throw out a cast 20 feet in front of it, in the direction it's headed. If you try anything closer you'll spook it. Then just wait, and hope the carp takes your fly. It's an excruciating 30 seconds or so waiting for the fish to methodically work its way to your fly. Use the time to make sure you've got the drag on your reel set properly, and your line isn't tangled around an guide or anything else. Often he'll give it a miss, or take something right next to it. But there's something incredibly satisfying to see that big mouth close on your dry. If he doesn't take it...wait til he swims past, and try again. If he does take the hook, set it, and get ready for for a long fight. Any fish that size is incredibly strong. Grass carp can be quite annoying, in that they'll let you lead them in, but they freak out when you go to release them, and swim out repeatedly. But it's all great fun on a light rod.


  3. #27
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    Newbie Question?

    I'm new to the carp fishing but I gave it try for the first time this week. Ended up with one small one around four pounds or so. The question I have is, I got maybe a half dozen other fish to take the fly but could not get hooked up. I sharpened the hook, waited a second after they took the fly before setting it and then tried not setting the hook till he or she turned. None of which seemed to make a difference. The fish I did catch I did not see him take the fly do to the mud cloud, one more strip and away we went. If anyone has any ideas to increase the catch ratio I would appreciate the help. Its usually the other way around the fish won't even look at the fly but this is frustrating the want to eat the thing but can't hook them.
    Thanks.


  4. #28
    Heath is offline Fishizzle, I use worms but I'm looking to upgrade!
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    On the hooking of carp...
    First, get rid of the barbs. They are absolutley worthless. Second, if you are not seeing the take, it will be very difficult. When fishing for carp you must set the situation up to give you every advantage. It is almost impossible to catch a carp if you can not see it.

    If anyone has carp they want to catch... I will gladly show you how.
    I am not embarrassed to say they are my favorite freshwater fish (in NJ).

    Carp fishing with a fly is more hunting than fishing. It is all about stealth approach and very visual. Oh yes, you can not get away with sloppy casting either. These fish are wild, they are well adapted to NOT get caught. When you hook one you will see what I mean about a fish that is not meant to be caught. You are truely deceiving the carp if you are able to catch one.

    A tip on the leader: Go as heavy as possible with F-carbon leader. A big carp (Over 20 lbs) will snap 5x like a spiderweb. Mono is a waste of time. You need to be able to control the fish (which you can't with a light tippet). If there is any structure in the water, the carp will undoubtably try to head for it and break you off.
    Open water is much better to actually land carp.


  5. #29
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    I used to "float fish" with pizza crust or french bread for carp when I was a kid. If it helps at all I know you have to make sure they take the fly first.. sometimes due to cloudy/muddy water conditions you can see the carps lips moving in and out try to grasp the object to eat.

    I grew up fishing the tidal section of the passaic river so i know all about carp fishing.. They also frequently take the object in and spit it right back out numberous times..so if you're watching your fish make sure he's not spitting your fly back out as your trying to hook him.


  6. #30
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    Talking

    also if you can tie a fly in a moleberry pattern that would be great


  7. #31
    Bernie is offline Fishizzle, I use worms but I'm looking to upgrade!
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    Reply

    Hi Bluefish94! A 4 pound carp is good!

    It is still trout season therefore I have not tried going for carps yet. From past summer experiences, I usually throw my bait/fly about 1 foot ahead of the target fish and wait for the take. If the water is muddy, just estimate where your fly is and tighten the line as the carp pass the spot. If the carp does not get spooked, then slowly retrieve your line and cast again 1 foot above the target fish. Carps are easily spooked and very selective on what they take in so have patience, the reward is as exciting as having a bluefish pull your line hard and tight.

    Happy fishing.


  8. #32
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    Thanks for the help guys, I got one more yesterday around 3 lbs. but still had another two fish take the fly but did not hook up. I guess with a 33% hook up rate I should not complain.


  9. #33
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    Well im new to fly fishing but i am well trained in the art of English style float fishing. Born english but raised in america my father taught me the art of Float fishing. Using floats varying in sizes and styles we have fished for everything from bluegills and crappies to Chinook salmon. In england Carp fishing is BIG BUSINESS. You use a different style rod usally 10 to 12 feet in length and most times thye use either bread, boilies ( an artificial bait dyed different colors, worm, fresh water mussels, sweet corn, maggots (fly larvae). Floating bread is the best especially when the fish are used to bread pieces fed to duck etc. In the UKn they talk about fine and far off meaning fine lines even for big fish and long distance casting ( yards not feet) Carp will often adapt to baitng a river or better still a pond or lake. It takes time but ground baiting with corn can work well. Fine hook mean that they dont effect the way a bait moves when a carp sucks it up. Carp can be finicky but when they are on a particular food the can be ravenous. My father fished for carp in small ponds and lakes where they can reach a decent size. If there are lilly pads fishing on or around them often works well.

    Well thats all for now. Hopefully my fly fishing skills get to a level where my float fishing is and ill never go home without atleast 1 fish. I picked up the fly gear because it looked alot harder and more precise than other fishing styles and seams more challenging. When you fish a lake and manage to pull 20 10 to 14 inch trout in about 6 hours you get bored, hahahah it was stalked im not that good. I was very suprised when i hooked and landed my first trout on a bead headed nymph because i barely knew it took the bait. Well good luck with your carp fishing and when you get a good one prepare for a fight. Later guys good luck and wish me good luck with my ff. Later

    Gwil out.


  10. #34
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    Re: Carp are killing me

    Mark Romero- Please refrain from using derogatory terms on the forum. Chinaman is not the preferred nomenclature. As for eating carp- They are very healthy eaters. For some reason because they can withstand poorer water quality people assume they eat trash. this is just not the case. They do eat a more vried diet than trout, which includes algaes and plant materials, but mostly its aqautic insects, crustaceans, fish, worms, etc. While I have not eaten them, I certainly am not aopposed to it and would do so in a heart beat. Just never had the opportunity.

    Anybody know any good locations for carp in the mercer/hunterdon/somerset area? I really want to catch one and get deep into the backing.


  11. #35
    skiezo is offline Fishizzle, I use worms but I'm looking to upgrade!
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    Re: Carp are killing me

    New member here.
    I target carp often on by home river. They are one of the toughest fish I to catch.
    I catch them when they are sipping bugs off the top more often
    than when they are feeding in the shallows on the bottom.
    I use either an 7 or 8 wt. for both smallies and carp.
    Even on the 8 wt. they are a tough fish to land.
    If bottom fishing for them I use a small crayfish soaked in fish oil.
    I am not ashamed to admit I target carp as a game fish.
    IHMO it is one of the most elusive fish to catch.
    I am mainly a smallie guy but carp are moving to the top.

    Brian


  12. #36
    wingnut is offline Fishizzle, I use worms but I'm looking to upgrade!
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    Re: Carp are killing me

    My 2 cents on carp.
    I've caught a bunch on a fly rod over the last few years. I use an eight wieght w/ floating line and a short 6 to 9 foot leader. I actually target them in May, June and July often INSTEAD of trout. I wish I could enter a picture but I cant figure it out.
    Anyway hear are a few tips. You don't need to scent your flys. You do need to take the fly put it in the water and rub what ever is on the stream bottom in to the fly. I find it hides any scent of humans. Also use florocarbon tippet at least 12lb. They have very good eyesight. Cast in a crayfish, stonefly, or bugger 2 feet in front and 1 foot past the tailing fish and creep the fly towards the fish as it muds up towards the fly. Accuracy is key and a miss will spook the fish. Often the fish will turn to the fly. If he does tighten the line and strip hook when you think hes got it. After a few fish it becomes second nature. After catching a fish you may need to abandon the pool or flat and move upstream. Never fish downstream or you are sure to spook every fish in the flat. Last year I documented over 80 fish and my friends did at least the same amount. It is addictive and 25+lb fish are possible all though I think 15-18lb fish pull and fight the hardest. If anyone wants a few picture let me know and I will be happy to back my claims. Oh yeah, Please don't kill these fish. After a few good fights you will never call them trash again....
    Dave


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