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  1. #1
    sonny is offline Fishizzle, I use worms but I'm looking to upgrade!
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    Can some streams be TOO difficult?

    Got back from fishing the Big Flatbrook and though having some success in the faster runs of the lower area, found the upper areas including the Fly stretch extremely hard to get a good read on and position to manuever. The water was somewhat low but consisting of decent runs. It was as crystal clear as any Jersey water I have seen in recent years. My question I guess then is: are some streams overall more difficult to master or should a decent flyfisherman be able to overcome these situations? Are some streams better off being left alone at times? I know it sounds like a loaded question but again I come home scratching my head and wondering: why did I drive so far?

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    golden beetle (10-21-2010)

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    Re: Can some streams be TOO difficult?

    Quote Originally Posted by sonny View Post
    Got back from fishing the Big Flatbrook and though having some success in the faster runs of the lower area, found the upper areas including the Fly stretch extremely hard to get a good read on and position to manuever. The water was somewhat low but consisting of decent runs. It was as crystal clear as any Jersey water I have seen in recent years. My question I guess then is: are some streams overall more difficult to master or should a decent flyfisherman be able to overcome these situations? Are some streams better off being left alone at times? I know it sounds like a loaded question but again I come home scratching my head and wondering: why did I drive so far?
    Have you ever considered fishing at a hatchery?

    It is possible to practice catch and release at the hatchery, although most people have their catch filleted on the spot.


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    coolkyle (10-21-2010)

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    Re: Can some streams be TOO difficult?

    Quote Originally Posted by sonny View Post
    Got back from fishing the Big Flatbrook and though having some success in the faster runs of the lower area, found the upper areas including the Fly stretch extremely hard to get a good read on and position to manuever. The water was somewhat low but consisting of decent runs. It was as crystal clear as any Jersey water I have seen in recent years. My question I guess then is: are some streams overall more difficult to master or should a decent flyfisherman be able to overcome these situations? Are some streams better off being left alone at times? I know it sounds like a loaded question but again I come home scratching my head and wondering: why did I drive so far?
    i fished there on sunday morning. saw some fish and the only 2 i had were on black zonkers. i dont see the fishing there being incredible this time of year. especially since two separate fishermen told me that a russian duo had been coming there almost every day and taking out tons of fish on bait in the fly stretch.


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    Re: Can some streams be TOO difficult?

    especially since two separate fishermen told me that a russian duo had been coming there almost every day and taking out tons of fish on bait in the fly stretch.[/QUOTE]

    That really chaps my ass. I am going to BFB today for a while, I pray that I see these assholes.

    Hell no and it aint over now.......

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    PRomano (10-22-2010)

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    Re: Can some streams be TOO difficult?

    To get back to the original questions:
    "My question I guess then is: are some streams overall more difficult to master or should a decent flyfisherman be able to overcome these situations?
    Absolutely some streams are more difficult to master, with "master" being a subjective term. Staying with the Flatbrook, during good spring flows and with the excellent hatches that the stream has, it is not very difficult to catch a dozen or two trout in a 3 hour outing (of course mostly stocked fish). When the water is skinny and the stocked trout have become more wary and the smaller percentage of wild trout have come out of hiding, most of the upper Flatbrook fishes much more like a WTS, with stealth a necessity. The exception are the few well known pools that may have dozens of trout that have been cought multiple times and it is more like fishing for trout at the Little Lehigh in PA. You will not catch as many trout as during the Spring, with 5-10 trout being an excellent outing. If you have ever fished waters like the Letort in PA with finicky, hard to approach, wild brown trout, catching and landing trout is an extreme challenge with 3-6 trout being an excellent outing (at least for me). On Summer mornings on the Musky, 2-4 fat browns in an hour or two can make my day. So yes, some streams are more difficult than others, and it is also impacted by the time of year and conditions

    Are some streams better off being left alone at times?

    Yes, during periods when fishing can stress the trout (usually thermal or lack of water) or when wading is required but could disturb trout spawning grounds. During difficult times, tactics will probably have to change and the challenge goes up. catching a trout under these conditions is a real test of skill, and landing a few can be more satisfying than catching 25+ in the Spring.


    I know it sounds like a loaded question but again I come home scratching my head and wondering: why did I drive so far? "

    I can't answer that, but for me I have no problem seeking out trout under challenging conditions. For me catching a few difficult trout is worth the trip.

    NJPB

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    Re: Can some streams be TOO difficult?

    I don't think I can anything to what Pat said. Well said.


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    Re: Can some streams be TOO difficult?

    I fished BFB today, started at the mud hole and went upstream, went well past the Blewitt Track wooden sign, came back down stream, hooked a right into little FB, caught a river chub, saw one big dead rainbow in little FB, fished back to the mud hole, fished for about a half hour at the Mud Hole, and at approximately 1:20 PM I landed a 12" rainbow on a gray ghost streamer. Then proceeded to Gyps tavern for a few cold ones.

    Hell no and it aint over now.......

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