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  1. #1
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    Suggestions Please

    I fly fish the North and South Branch, and sometimes the Black river. I usually catch at least one, if not only one, trout every time I go. I am looking for a good book that will help me with fly selection for the time of year and time of day in these, or any, rivers. The past couple of times I've went I was surrounded by rising fish but could only catch one each time. Any suggestions would be much appreciated by this beginner fly fisherman.


  2. #2
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    Re: Suggestions Please

    The only book I know of that is specific to fly fishing New Jersey streams is Matt Grobert's book " Fly Fishing New Jersey Trout Streams".
    All the major fly shops in NJ carry it. Since you're in Bridgewater try Efingers in Bound Brook.



    "The great charm of fly fishing is that we are always learning." Theodore Gordon



  3. #3
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    Re: Suggestions Please

    The book that I found to be useful in identifing insects is Art Flicks Stream Side Guide. When I was in my youth. Tihs book gave me a edge on insect identification and what flies to use.


  4. #4
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    Re: Suggestions Please

    Matt Groberts book and the Mid Atlantic Fly Fisherman magazine you get free at fly shops are a good start.

    Hatch charts are only a rough guide - variables in weather, water flow, etc change things a lot. Here is a great article on the topic:

    http://www.troutnut.com/article/34/i...ch-information

    Plus, the Troutnut site is a great resource on aquatic insects and fishing.


  5. #5
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    Re: Suggestions Please

    I will definitely check those out. I always have trouble picking flies. Well at least I know what I will buy with my next paycheck.


  6. #6
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    Re: Suggestions Please

    "Hatch Guide to New England Streams" by Thomas Ames Jr. Very thorough hatch and insect info, works perfect for NY,PA, and NJ.

    Listen To The River Sing Sweet Songs To Rock My Soul...

  7. #7
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    Re: Suggestions Please

    I'll try to make it simple:

    All mayfly nymphs can be represented OK by hare's ears and pheasant tail nymphs - can do better, but that's down the line. If all you had were hare's ears and PT's you could probably catch fish all season in any trout stream on the planet. In the spring prior to hatching the nymphs run bigger, mostly 12 to 16. In late spring and early summer they run smaller, say 16 to 20. If you fished 14 and 16's all season you would do OK.

    In April it's time for the "April Grays" - a bunch of darker colored mayflies. Can't go wrong with Adams in 12 - 16. Look at whatever bugs you see and use the similar sized Adams.

    Then the mayflies die down and caddis become more prevalent. Caddis are a pain - try swinging traditional wet flies. However, caddis are one of those lifelong learning challenges.

    In mid May the lighter mayflies start and go into June. A light colored mayfly pattern - lets just say a parachute Cahill or cream or yellow sparkle dun - in 12 to 16 will do OK. These start hatching in the afternoon, but shift towards night as the weather gets hotter.

    NJ is mostly too warm to fish in the summer, but in NJ's few cold spots a 14 foam beetle on top and a Zebra Midge down will get you started.

    When in doubt an olive, black, brown, or white wooly bugger will catch a fish or two.

    On dark, cloudy days all year some small BWO is possible - so an 18 or 20 olive in the box wouldn't hurt.

    In the fall start looking at those April flies again.

    That will get you started and you can refine your techniques with practice. Probably it is more important to make the fly act like a bug in front of a trout (i.e. better presentation) than look exactly like the bug (i.e. better fly pattern). Life is best when you get both right, but most experienced fishermen will say worry about presentation first.

    IMHO, only the "super hatches" really get the fish snooty. Now the "super hatch" is the sulphurs. Soon it will be the tricos. Learn those, the olives (all year), Hendricksons (April), March Browns (mid May), and Isos (June through September) and you will manage OK. Fish munch caddis pretty well, but they get tricky. Try your best and learn over time.

    When to fish? The old rule of thumb is when you are most comfortable - that means in the afternoon in cold weather and at dusk and dawn in hot weather. The other rule of thumb that is more applicable to most of us is fish when you have free time.

    The world is full of exceptions to the rules and you will continue to learn things as long as you fly fish, but starting simple will get you into fish. No fly or technique works all the time, and every one of the millions of flies out there has had its day. The more stuff you learn the more often you will have what it takes to catch fish on any given day.


  8. #8
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    Re: Suggestions Please

    Quote Originally Posted by cornacchia View Post
    I fly fish the North and South Branch, and sometimes the Black river. I usually catch at least one, if not only one, trout every time I go. I am looking for a good book that will help me with fly selection for the time of year and time of day in these, or any, rivers. The past couple of times I've went I was surrounded by rising fish but could only catch one each time. Any suggestions would be much appreciated by this beginner fly fisherman.
    Sup bro..I have about 10 post out of 30 on this site in regard to the limited selection of dries I use..why..colors etc.. so you can dredge those up if you wish but here's what I operate with:

    CDC Adams Comparadun 12-26 (for darker mayflies)
    CDC Light Cahill Comparadun 12-20 (for lighter mayflies)
    X-Caddis Tan 14-20
    Griffith's Gnat 18-26
    Parachute Black Ant 18
    Royal Stimulator 16
    Little Brown Trout Streamer 10

    Take that..tack on a few essential nymphs, wets, and another streamer or two and you'll be able to take fish pretty much anywhere in the east..spend your time focusing much more on presentation and casting skill and you'll be surprised how productive you can be with even a thin arsenal of flies. Flyshack.com also has the hatch charts for most prominent rivers in the northeast so take a look at that site when you have a chance...take it easy buddy -MT


  9. #9
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    Re: Suggestions Please

    I use Matt Grobert's book, and I carry this one streamside (it's tiny):
    Pocket Guide to Pennsylvania Hatches Charlie Meck and Paul Weamer

    These guys have some excellent photography, and they tie the hatches to streamside plants that are in bloom. i find this really helpfull.

    Proud supporter of Trout Unlimited.

  10. #10
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    Re: Suggestions Please

    Grobert's book is very good. He mentions in the book one fly in particular that works very well on the South Branch (and many of NJ's streams) and that is a version of Fran Betters' Usual. It is a very simple Mayfly imitation that is made from one material - Snowshoe rabbit foot.

    You can tie it in different colors to represent many of the Mayflies. There is an excellent YouTube- Tying Fran Betters' Usual with Davie McPhail demonstrating how to tie The Usual (hopefully that link works - if not just search for it.

    Having said that, I fish some basic nymphs - Hare's Ear, Prince Nymph and a few caddis patterns - and emergers about 90% of the time on the South Branch, even when fish are rising.

    I also tend to focus on the fast, skinny "B" water rather than the pools. Fish the seams and pockets around the rocks and you'll be surprised how many fish are there.

    More important, keep at it!


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