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  1. #1
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    The Catskill style

    If you were asked how to define the "catskill style" of tying how would you do it? I know some of the history but am curious about what makes it different than any other style?

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  2. #2
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    Ed, two things, (well, one actually) to consider first. Do you mean, NOW, what might be accepted as the "style" now, OR, the originall style? If you were to be referring to the originall style, and summing it up in a "word," the "word" would be, Sparse. Of course i am, for the most part, refering to dry flies. The originall Catskill style dry flies were extremely spares. Much sparser than the way they are tyed today, for the most part. "Back in the days," when the style was developed, folks fished with cat cut leaders and used a turel knot to attach the fly. Therefore you needed to leave at least one eye lenght bare right behind the eye for the knot. Also the wings, and bodies, and yes, even the hackle were much more sparse than on most of todays flies. Most commercial flies tyed today, (in that style) are much more full or more heavily tyed than "back in the days." There are also a whole set of proportion rules that are supposed to be followed in order for a Catskill fly to be authentic. Things like the fact that the wing is to be tyed in one fourth to one third the way back on the shank. The tail is supposed to be one hook (not shank) length long. Wings should also be that same length high. Hackle should be a cap and a half in length, etc., etc., etc. I'd say basically the whole thing goes way back to the very early 20th century, (the 20's) when the style was being solidified, and historically defined. Before that it was still a work in progress, and in a way it always will be. But if your trying to define a "style" you need to boil it down to a few inescapable "truths." Sparse is one. Dig? mark

    Mark J. Romero
    www.fudr.org
    607-498-9944
    M&M Fly Fishing
    JazzMark Gallery
    94 Yorktown Road
    Roscoe, N.Y. 12776-5017

  3. #3
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    For Example

    This is an example of a catskill style dry fly.

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    Pictures taken before/after/during fly fishing:
    http://dcabarle.smugmug.com/Sports/F...79119552_XXeHe

  4. #4
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    Dennis, you pic does show one thing that did, and still does help to define a well tyed Catskill style dry fly. When tyed correctly, the hook should never even touch the water. The tail and hackle help it to ride high enough to where the hook never touches. Thereby NOT messing up the profile or silowette of the fly. Now that's all fine and dandy on broken water. But i do not think that works as well as a Comparadun for example on nice flat, glossy smooth, slow water. Which only goes to prove that each style has it's applications. mark

    Mark J. Romero
    www.fudr.org
    607-498-9944
    M&M Fly Fishing
    JazzMark Gallery
    94 Yorktown Road
    Roscoe, N.Y. 12776-5017

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