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  1. #1
    Martin B. Hyatt NEFF Guest


    Post What is Flyfishing?

    What is flyfishing?

    Flyfishing is a way of fishing with lightweight lures called
    flies. Flies are so called because many are imitations of
    insects, especially aquatic insects such as mayflies (but note
    that many flies imitate fishes, crustaceans, or other prey
    items). Special rods and lines are used to cast flies. The key
    difference from other types of casting is that in flyfishing, it
    is the weight of the line rather than the lure which loads the
    rod and carries the cast.


    Why flyfish?

    Basically, we flyfish because it is fun. Of course, most of us
    also feel that it is intellectually challenging, physically
    invigorating, and spiritually refreshing. Basically, it's fun.


    Why flyfish rather than fish some other way?

    Fishing styles, even among flyfishers, are individualistic,
    reflecting the personality of the fisher. Some of us would claim
    that there are times when flyfishing is the most effective means
    of sportfishing. This might be true when trout are feeding on
    hatching mayflies, for instance. On the other hand, some of us
    enjoy the challenge of using flies even when another method of
    fishing might be more productive in the sense of hooking fish.
    Some of us enjoy the simple grace of flycasting. Of course, many
    flyfishers spinfish or baitcast as well, but many of us think
    it's often more fun to flyfish.


    Is flyfishing fun for the fishes?

    Fishing can be painful for the fishes. And some people do not
    fish for that reason. Those of us who fish do not relish the
    pain that we inflict upon fishes. However, we accept it. We
    strive to be responsible fishers. Fishes that we release should
    be handled carefully to maximize their chances for survival.
    Fishes that are killed and kept should be eaten, not wasted. And
    streams, lakes, bottoms, vegetation, and shorelines should also
    be handled carefully.


    Is flyfishing expensive?

    Flyfishing, as practiced by many of us, is not very expensive.
    And luckily, the fishes don't seem to care where you bought your
    equipment. The helpful fishers on the flyfish list can advise
    you on how to buy affordable, functional equipment that meets
    your particular needs. And if, after getting hooked on
    flyfishing, you want to sacrifice your family fortune to buy 43
    antique bamboo rods and every new high-tech gadget that comes
    along, we'll help you with that as well.


    Is flyfishing difficult to learn?

    Flyfishing, like computing, seems impossible for some beginners
    at first. As in computing, this phase is mercifully short-lived
    for most of us. It helps to have some personal instruction in
    casting, whether from a patient friend, a proud papa, or a
    skilled instructor. Fortunately, it doesn't take long to learn
    the basics and to have fun, and fortunately, there is always more
    to learn.


    Do I need a PhD in entomology?

    Advanced degrees are not necessary for flyfishing, even though it
    might at first seem that way to a beginner. Trout fishers often
    try to figure out what the fish are eating, so that they can
    imitate the food items with appropriate flies. Along the way, we
    learn something about aquatic insects. Most of us think that's
    part of the fun. But it is also fun to fool fish with a fly that
    doesn't look like any particular bug or minnow. Try to look at
    the world from a fish's perspective, and see what happens.


    Is baitfishing a bad word?

    Baitfishing is simply another type of fishing. Many people fish
    with flies sometimes, with other artificial lures sometimes, and
    with bait sometimes. Some of us like to flyfish only.
    Baitfishers and flyfishers have much in common. All fishers
    should try to work together to preserve and restore the waters we
    love.


    Why are some waters designated flyfishing only?

    Flyfishing only waters are designated by the local fishing
    authorities such as a state or provincial department of fish and
    game. Management decisions like this are often complex and
    sometimes controversial. Often, political as well as scientific
    factors influence these decisions. For more information, contact
    your local fisheries department and local fishing organizations.


    What defines a "fly" versus other artificial lures?

    In reality, there is no definitive answer to this question. So
    many different types of lures have been used with flycasting
    equipment. As stated above, flies tend to be lightweight.
    However, any area that has designated flyfishing only waters will
    have an arbitrary definition that you should know and follow. It
    may or may not be permitted to use weighted flies or weighted
    lines, for instance. Learn your local regulations.


    Can flies be scented?

    It is unusual to scent flies, but it is sometimes done. You may
    not be permitted to do this in some waters designated for fishing
    with artificial lures only or for flyfishing only. Check your
    local regulations first.


    Should I eat my fish?

    Some flyfishers eat some of the fishes they catch; some don't.
    Many fishes are downright tasty when prepared properly. A few
    fishes are downright inedible. You may not wish to eat the fish
    you catch. Some people enjoy fishing, but do not eat fish (for
    various reasons). Local management considerations may dictate
    that you either keep or not keep your catch. Do not eat your
    catch if it comes from polluted water or if local regulations
    mandate that you release it.


    What is "catch and release"?

    "Catch and release" means releasing the fishes that one catches.
    Some waters are designated "catch and release" meaning that
    fishing is permitted (check regulations regarding dates and
    methods), but all fishes caught must be released. This is often
    a management decision intended to preserve a high quality fishery
    in an area of heavy fishing pressure. Some flyfishers practice
    "catch and release" even in areas where keeping fishes is
    permitted. Release fishes carefully so as not to injure them.


    Will released fish die anyway?

    If fishes caught with artificial lures such as flies are handled
    carefully, most will survive. Apparently, many factors influence
    survival after release. If the fish was already stressed before
    being caught, for instance because of spawning or high water
    temperatures, it is less likely to survive. If the fish is
    "played" for a long time and is exhausted before release, it is
    probably less likely to survive. If the fish is hooked through a
    sensitive area such as the gills or the eye, or is hooked deeply
    in the throat (which seems more likely when using bait), it is
    less likely to survive. If the fish is handled roughly, for
    example squeezed strongly or held out of water too long, it is
    also less likely to survive. If a fish seems to be having
    difficulty after unhooking, cradle it gently in the water until
    it regains its equilibrium and swims off under its own power.


    Should I use barbless hooks?

    Barbless hooks are becoming more popular and in some cases are
    mandated by local regulations. Some hooks are manufactured as
    barbless but barbed hooks can be made "barbless" by crimping down
    the barb with pliers. Barbless hooks may be better at hooking
    fishes because of easier penetration. Barbless hooks are easier
    to remove from fishes after capture and this should increase
    survival chances because of the decreased handling involved.
    Some people feel that barbless hooks are more likely to come
    loose while playing a fish. Most flyfishers practicing "catch
    and release" would probably recommend using barbless hooks.



    This file is posted periodically to the flyfish list by
    Marty Hyatt (hyatt@duq3.cc.duq.edu). Please direct comments or
    questions about this file directly to me and not to the list.

    Similar Threads:

  2. #2
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    Nice write-up! Thanks for posting it.

    Pictures taken before/after/during fly fishing:
    http://dcabarle.smugmug.com/Sports/F...79119552_XXeHe

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    Well, now that the surface has been scratched.........two things to start. First: fly fishing only areas are often designated that way so as to insure a successfull rate of catch and release. To designate an area catch and release, and not make it fly fishing only, is to do a half way job. Which is why we have the problems we do on the Willowemoc and the Beaverkill. Spin fisherman come to the catch and release ares to fish, catch and release a fish, and because that fish was caught on a trebel hook and had half it's head ripped off, it dies anyway. Of course that's an exaggeraton, but it makes the point. Trebel hooks do to much damage to a fish to be allowed to be used in the catch and realese areas, IMHO. But, unfortunately common sense aint common. So, we still have antiquaited laws governing our waters. Not to mention the local Chamber of Commerace is in bed with the DEC and wants Joe Blow and his six rug rats from Jersey up here spending their money. Second: barbless hooks should be used ALSO, because if you end up with that hook in your hand, you gonna damn well wish it was barbless. Dig? Now, let's just see what some of you can come up with to "Go Beyond" scratching the surface????????? mark

    Mark J. Romero
    www.fudr.org
    607-498-9944
    M&M Fly Fishing
    JazzMark Gallery
    94 Yorktown Road
    Roscoe, N.Y. 12776-5017

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    Hey I'm from Jersey......LOL

    It's really not just about catching fish, too bad so many people just don't get it.

  5. #5
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    Hi Marty,

    You wrote,

    "Flyfishing is a way of fishing with lightweight lures called
    flies. Flies are so called because many are imitations of
    insects, especially aquatic insects such as mayflies (but note
    that many flies imitate fishes, crustaceans, or other prey
    items). Special rods and lines are used to cast flies. The key
    difference from other types of casting is that in flyfishing, it
    is the weight of the line rather than the lure which loads the
    rod and carries the cast."

    I completely agree with that as a definition of what 'fly fishing' should be and is supposed to be. It is the definition that I would subscribe to. Unfortunately that is not the case and is not a functional/working definition of the current state of fly fishing.

    - Lead, tungsten and other metals are used for underbodies to add weight. Additionally, bead heads and barbell eyes, also made of those materials are used in the construction of 'flies'. These various weighted lures, especially the latter in my humble opinion, are accepted as 'flies' in spite of the fact that they are nothing more then 'jigs'.

    - Because of the nature of the lures I described above, casting the fly no longer depends on the line providing the weight. In cases where these lures are used it is not, "the weight of the line rather than the lure which loads the rod and carries the cast." It is the weight of the lure. Usually it is some kind of flip cast that gets the lure out. It is certainly not a typical fly cast. It is "Chuck and Duck" casting at its finest(tic)!

    - It is not unusual to see running line, made of thin fly line or even
    monofiliment, after only a short length of fly line. This allows the
    weighted lure to be cast differently and further then if actual fly line was used.

    Yet, in spite of these nuances, weighted, beaded, barbell eyed 'flies', running lines and other variations are accepted as 'fly fishing'. Like I said earlier, I totally agree with your definition. I wish, as far as fly fishing, it was the case but it is not.

    "Why flyfish rather than fish some other way?"
    For me it's simply becasue I enjoy it more, at least where and for the fish I pursue in fresh water.

    "Is flyfishing fun for the fishes? Fishing can be painful for the fishes"
    Give me a break!

    "Is flyfishing expensive?"
    It's as inexpensive, OR expensive, as you want it to be. You can buy all the stuff you need to be functional for a couple of hundred $s or several thousand $s if you choose.

    "Is flyfishing difficult to learn?"
    Learn? Not necessarily. Get better, good, very good, etc. takes a lifetime.

    "Do I need a PhD in entomology?"
    No.

    "Is baitfishing a bad word?"
    No. However, there're places for it and there are places where the method should not be used.

    "Why are some waters designated flyfishing only?"
    Too many ecological, environmental, economical, political reasons to list.

    "What defines a "fly" versus other artificial lures?"
    In reality, local laws. In spirit, what I wrote way above.

    "Can flies be scented?"
    Of course they can.
    Does the scent really work? I don't know.
    If the scent works, is it less sporting to use? Of course.
    Is it legal? I don't think so.

    "Should I eat my fish?"
    If caught legally in a C & K area, sure. Suggest you cook it first.

    "What is "catch and release?"
    Simply means letting the fish go after being brought 'to hand'. Release fish quickly and with as little handling as possible to improve the chances of that fishes survival.

    "Will released fish die anyway?"
    There is some chance that released fish will die. However, there is 100% chance that kept fish will die.

    "Should I use barbless hooks?"
    In some places this is the law. Regardless, it is a known fact (and I can attest to it) that barbless hooks are easier to get out of the human body then barbed hooks. Nuff said.

    Also, just for the record, your essay was a good read.

    Allan

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    Cool

    Yes, agreed, good read. And it's also true that fly fishing is technically what the law spells it out to be. As a mostly saltwater fly guy, I don't know if what I use would even be considered "fly fishing" by a dry fly trout purist (no offense to anyone, just trying to make a point). I routinely use sinking lines, heavily weighted "flies", "flies" made with ultra-realistic (though synthetic) materials, and "flies" that could be thrown easily with a freshwater spinning rod. Are these truely flies? Am I really "fly fishing"? I'd like to think so, but deep down it's more like I'm just fishing with a fly rod. It's all personal opinion and no one is right or wrong in this case. Some people "fly fish" with worms on a hook in a stream, dead drifting them around rocks and under logs. They are using all fly tackle and fly fishing tactics, yet live bait is their lure. Is that still fly fishing? When I have to get deep to find stripers, say 20 ft or so, I'll use a heavy sinking line with a heavily weighted fly. Am I still "fly fishing", or just chucking out a jig on a modified trolling line? These are the gray areas that can't really be addressed to anyone's complete satisfaction. Fishing is fishing, and any way people want to catch them is fine by me, as long as they stay within the law and don't unnessessarily hurt the fish if they intend to release them. And of course, they must only use natural materials, hand-forged hooks, 8X cat gut tippets, silk lines, and bamboo rods....


  7. #7
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    Oh boy, this is goona be one "long winded saga." LMAO. Dennis, prepare page 4 and 5 now, LOL. willow.............rotf

    Mark J. Romero
    www.fudr.org
    607-498-9944
    M&M Fly Fishing
    JazzMark Gallery
    94 Yorktown Road
    Roscoe, N.Y. 12776-5017

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    Willow,

    I noticed your wrote, "rotf". Is that because you've already 'LYAO'?

    Allan

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    Mostly because i'm looking forward to what comes next. I often rotf while doing that, LOL. ............Jesus Christ, you outta see the mess on the floor...................i got 4 Parakeets in two cages yesterday, and the only place i can fig. to keep 'em is in the dinning room/tying room two, but wholy shit they really CAN make a mess, LOL. mark

    Mark J. Romero
    www.fudr.org
    607-498-9944
    M&M Fly Fishing
    JazzMark Gallery
    94 Yorktown Road
    Roscoe, N.Y. 12776-5017

  10. #10
    saltfly NEFF Guest


    Hi Marty,


    "Why flyfish rather than fish some other way?"
    Because itís more graceful, more challenging, more yeah right itís all about adrenaline baby, nothing like seeing a 20lb striper slam a popper tied on to the end of your tippet. AKA because itís a sh%& load of fun.
    "Is flyfishing fun for the fishes? If your waiter put a sharp metal object in your steak yanked you out of your seat grabbed you by the throat and then threw you in a cooler of ice, would that be fun?
    "Is flyfishing expensive?"
    Not if you a Firestone, otherwise tippets, hooks, rods, reels, fly line, shooting heads. Hell yes itís expensive.
    "Is flyfishing difficult to learn?"
    Not if Lefty Kreh is your grand dad. No really itís not that hard just takes some practice and a patient teacher.

    "Do I need a PhD in entomology?"
    No. I hate bugs.

    "Is baitfishing a bad word?"
    No. Sometimes fishes (as you call them) want the meat and you got to give them the meat.

    "Why are some waters designated flyfishing only?"
    Because us flyfisherman are sick and tired of some guy who looks like he walked out of an LL Bean Catalog trampling thru the river with a 10 foot spinning rod dragging a salmon net and 100qt cooler behind him.
    "What defines a "fly" versus other artificial lures?"
    What you said sounded good
    .
    "Can flies be scented?"
    Yes, I soak them in chum once in a while or shedder crab oil. Every little bit helps on those tuff days.

    "Should I eat my fish?"
    You have to hook it to cook it, but if you do practice filet and release and enjoy the fish fry.

    "What is "catch and release?"
    When I told my wife I was working and canít bring the fish home to clean.

    "Will released fish die anyway?"
    Maybe, but I try to be gentle.

    "Should I use barbless hooks?"
    If you intend to release the fish yes, if you intend to cook emí no. If you hook your self repeatedly maybe you should take up golf.
    Great essay by the way thanks for posting it.


  11. #11
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    Cool WWWwwwwwooooooowwwww

    saltfly, you done good...................mark

    Mark J. Romero
    www.fudr.org
    607-498-9944
    M&M Fly Fishing
    JazzMark Gallery
    94 Yorktown Road
    Roscoe, N.Y. 12776-5017

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