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Thread: New to Bamboo

  1. #1
    Myles is offline Fishizzle, I use worms but I'm looking to upgrade!
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    New to Bamboo

    Just got an older damaged Cortland 8' 6" with a broken tip replaced with an old stock never fished replacement.

    Love the thing and have been out a lot this year on the Housatonic and the Roe Jan in New York with it. I love it and am really hooked on this rod.

    Would any of you with experience please send me your thoughts on using this thing? Am I, as a newly back to the sport fisherman, going to give myself a hard time by sticking with this thing? I love the way it feels and like the idea of really 'learning' to fish with bamboo...

    It's a 7wt, which is a lot different than the 5wt graphite that a lot of the guys seem to be using, so I hear. I really want to get better and really learn to enjoy my time out there, so do I get a newer rod until I'm really proficient and then go back to this thing, or just stick with it?

    I'd love to hear anyone with experience give me some tips - especially about line, leaders, tippets, etc, before I give it up, but any thougts appreciated.
    Thanks!


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    Re: New to Bamboo

    It's a sport - there is no right answer. Do what feels right to you.

    If you love fishing with the bamboo rod stick with it until you can't do something you want to with it. There are plenty of people who only fish bamboo and bamboo has a slower, smoother action that many people find relaxing. Let's say that you get turned on to fishing tricos on a small stream in the summer and the 7 wt seems a bit heavy for the task at hand - then look into something new.

    However, I sense you have some issues with the rod. I would borrow a 4 or 5 wt medium to medium fast action graphite rod and try it out. If that feels great to you, maybe it is time to look at a graphite rod. If it doesn't - then you can feel comfortable sticking with the bamboo. Only way to find out what feels best to you is to try other rods. And use other people's opinions only as guidance - it is a sport, do what feels right to you.

    A fly casting lesson or two may help your decision too. IMHO, casting skills are 10x more important than the rod. Rods are just flexible sticks. Can't get too wrapped up in the gear until you are comfortable with your casting skills.


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    Re: New to Bamboo

    JeffK has it right. Have fun, first and foremost.

    Secondly, he is absolutely correct about a lesson or two, or class. You will learn alot, get to cast some rods, and probably best of all, feel a little more confident on a stream. That makes things a lot more fun.

    Good luck, Don


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    Re: New to Bamboo

    Hi Myles,
    Welcome to our world of fishing 'cane! That's quite a heavy line rod to start out with, but you're on your way with learning how to handle them...... I've fished cane exclusively for 16 years now, selling off my graphite to feed the need to fish and relax with the slower flexing rods of yesteryear. From past experiences with teaching others how to cast cane, I've instructed them to stay with their cane rod for at least a few fishing trips consecutively before going back to graphite, to become well acquainted with cane so it's burned into their memory........ I also prefer a little heavier reel to counterbalance the additional weight of the cane to prevent your wrist from constantly holding the rod balance in check. Your casting hand should act as the fulcrum
    that naturally balances rod and reel.

    I prefer the Wulff Triangle Taper fly lines with their elongated taper that turns over so nice, especially when roll casting in tight areas.

    PM me your address and I'll send you a pamphlet on caring for your rod.

    Good luck to you,
    Canefly


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