Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Joe D's Avatar
    Joe D is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    NE PA, NY, NJ
    Posts
    1,544
    Thanks
    391
    Thanked 657 Times in 311 Posts
    Chats
    2
    Groans
    1
    Groaned 0 Times in 0 Posts


    What’s in that fracking fluid?

    "I think I fish, in part, because it's an anti-social, bohemian business that, when gone about properly, puts you forever outside the mainstream culture without actually landing you in an institution." John Gierach

    www.FlyFishTheDelaware.com


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Unadilla, New York
    Posts
    4,654
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 477 Times in 356 Posts
    Chats
    372
    Groans
    2
    Groaned 21 Times in 19 Posts


    Re: What’s in that fracking fluid?

    I just read the "Chenango Greens-State hides..." written for the Narrowsburg Reporter I believe. It was from May 10, and may not be accurate.

    Here is an article from The Press & Sun Bulletin, on Sunday( I'll highlight what I'm talking about):

    Questions surround gas-drilling waste water
    Treatment plants' capabilities lacking
    By Tom Wilber • Press & Sun-Bulletin • July 27, 2008

    Try pouring 10 gallons of industrial waste into a 10-ounce cup, and there you have the disposal problem regulators face with the natural gas industry settling into the Twin Tiers.


    Once the drilling starts and millions of gallons of waste water begin flowing from thousands of wells, it will become everybody's problem, environmentalists say.

    Treatment plants set up in the region aren't designed to handle the volume or type of waste expected from tapping the Marcellus Shale Formation, the rich reserve of natural gas running under the Southern Tier and Catskill region, throughout Pennsylvania and parts of Ohio and West Virginia.

    "It's just the sort of question people are puzzling over here," Jim Tierney, assistant commissioner for water resources with the state Department of Environmental Conservation, said late last week.

    Sparky Delong, who operates a private treatment plant in Franklin, Pa., has an answer: Build more plants.

    He operates Pennsylvania Brine Treatment, which serves the drilling industry exclusively. The company, specializing in the alchemy of turning waste into profit, is ready to build six more plants in the Keystone State to capitalize on the waste-disposal problem in Pennsylvania.

    The Franklin plant, about 50 miles north of Pittsburgh, treats brine water, as well as the more toxic byproducts of well drilling, including hydraulic fracturing fluid that contains additives used to break the shale apart to increase well production. Waste products from drilling also include acids, low-level radiation and heavy metals.

    The contents of fracturing fluid -- called fracing (frack-ing) fluid -- is a guarded industry secret and varies from company to company, each using various chemical recipes to boost production. With the advent of more natural gas exploration, and technology making horizontal wells more common, a national debate is emerging over the wisdom of injecting toxic chemicals into the ground without full disclosure and strict oversight.

    For the past 25 years, Delong treated waste from vertical wells traditionally drilled in the area. The plant currently handles about 205,000 gallons a day, and another plant in Josephine, Pa., east of Pittsburgh, processes about 155,000 gallons.

    Horizontal wells will produce waste on a vastly larger scale. Each one encompasses areas 10 times greater than a typical vertical well, and there will be many more of them because the Marcellus shale covers such a vast geographical area.

    How much waste is that?

    "I can't even answer that," Delong said. "It's staggering."

    It's also a big sticking point for regulators and the industry facing a comprehensive environmental review before it can begin horizontal drilling in New York. Tierney acknowledged a lack of oversight in other parts of the country, and said they will not issue permits for horizontal wells until questions are answered.

    A basic question, of course, is: What's in the frac'ing fluid?

    An answer is necessary before the next critical question can be addressed: Where will it go to be treated?

    Sending it to Franklin, Pa., 280 miles from Binghamton and already operating near its limits, isn't a satisfactory answer.

    Practical access to waste-disposal sites is an important condition for environmental safety. The further it has to slosh over rail or highway, the greater the traffic, costs, chances of accidents and incentives for dumping.

    "Without that information, we will not issue a permit," Tierney said a day after Gov. David Paterson ordered an overhaul of the process to regulate drilling's environmental impact. "Nobody is escaping the review."

    The regulatory overhaul, which will include public hearings and comments extending into next year, will focus on the impact on groundwater, surface water, wetlands, air quality, aesthetics, noise, traffic and community character, as well as drilling's cumulative impact.

    The review is designed to uncover problems and put measures in place to fix them, including where water will come from for the horizontal drilling and how waste will be disposed of, Tierney said.

    The problem became even more acute after the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection recently ordered sewage treatment plants to stop accepting drilling waste water without knowing what it is and how to treat it.

    Dave Allis, manager of a plant in Sayre, Pa., said the site was running clear fluids imported from drilling companies, but it stopped after the DEP warning in June. The plant lacked the wherewithal to test for metals and other contamination in a timely and cost-efficient way.

    "It was more headache than it's worth," he said.

    For specialists like Delong, that's an opportunity. He said he knows what's in the waste water based on who brings it to him, even though companies specializing in frac'(hearts)ng fluids -- like Halliburton -- are exempt from federal rules requiring disclosure of their contents.

    How does he get around that?

    "Twenty-five years experience," he said cryptically.

    John
    Some circumstantial evidence is very strong, as when you find a trout in the milk.--Henry David Thoreau

  3. #3
    Kilgour Farms's Avatar
    Kilgour Farms is offline I took the one less traveled by
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Hancock
    Posts
    536
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
    Chats
    0
    Groans
    0
    Groaned 0 Times in 0 Posts


    Re: What’s in that fracking fluid?

    Just think a new industry will be born out of this. Maybe NYC should take notice of filtration and recycling technics that will be used to process the waste water.

    NYC should lease for gas take the money and reinvest it into new filtration and desalinization plants closer to home.
    Then they could also use the money to build power generation closer to home.


  4. #4
    Joe D's Avatar
    Joe D is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    NE PA, NY, NJ
    Posts
    1,544
    Thanks
    391
    Thanked 657 Times in 311 Posts
    Chats
    2
    Groans
    1
    Groaned 0 Times in 0 Posts


    Re: What’s in that fracking fluid?

    Interesting that Jack Dahl, director of the DEC’s Bureau of Gas and Oil Regulation said, “I can tell you that our experience has been that the companies in our state do not use these toxic fluids. I know these companies well and I don’t believe they are lying to us.”

    What about the chemical concentrations that are left in the ground? The normal radioactive materials that are concentrated and brought to the surface? Heavy metals that are released?

    I can make a nice piece of change off some Delaware County properties if this gas drilling takes off, but I'd gladly forgo it if it threatens irreparable harm to the environment and causes human health problems.

    "Don't it always seem to go
    That you don't know what you got till it's gone"


    "I think I fish, in part, because it's an anti-social, bohemian business that, when gone about properly, puts you forever outside the mainstream culture without actually landing you in an institution." John Gierach

    www.FlyFishTheDelaware.com


Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Thread Participants: 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42